Ktismatics

28 September 2006

What If God… (Part One)

Filed under: Ktismata — ktismatics @ 3:11 pm

What if God doesn’t know everything but is a good learner?

What if God can’t do everything but works really hard?

What if God can’t imagine every possibility but likes surprises?

What if God can’t control everything but is a great improviser?

What if God makes mistakes but isn’t too proud to admit them?

What if God can’t transcend time but uses time as an opportunity to introduce change and difference?

What if God had absolutely nothing to do with creating the material world but has everything to do with making sense of it?

What if God is more like us than unlike us?

Can you imagine such a God?

Advertisements

3 Comments »

  1. What if God doesn’t know everything but is a good learner?

    Well, I guess if God decided he wanted to be a learner, then he would probably be the best one…

    What if God can’t do everything but works really hard?

    Then he would be a Capitalist??? Or maybe just blue collar?

    What if God can’t imagine every possibility but likes surprises?

    In this case I would be surprised!

    What if God can’t control everything but is a great improviser?

    Would there be a difference?

    What if God makes mistakes but isn’t too proud to admit them?

    Then I hope he messes up with somebody else, but gets it right for me!!

    What if God can’t transcend time but uses time as an opportunity to introduce change and difference?

    Then I would be even more inclined towards the so-called A-Theory of time…

    What if God had absolutely nothing to do with creating the material world but has everything to do with making sense of it?

    Then what was Qohelet talking about???

    What if God is more like us than unlike us?
    Can you imagine such a God?

    Personally, I lean the other way. Towards the radical transcendant God….at least from a theoretical perspective!

    Like

    Comment by Jonathan Erdman — 28 September 2006 @ 5:21 pm

  2. Dude, you’ve been busy! Okay, so this post was inspired by a long and somewhat contentious exchange here. It’s also related to your post about Molinism. It’s easier for Christians to imagine a God who can do things that no human can possibly do, for which there is absolutely no precedent in our earthly experience: omniscience, omnipresence, eternity, transcendence, the ability to imagine all possible universes, etc. Certainly others have imagined more limited Gods; e.g., the Greeks and the Canaanites. Others have a hard time imagining any kind of god at all.
    Christians find it easier to imagine something they already believe than something they don’t believe. Christians also find it easier to believe in the kind of God they’re prepared to worship, which means a God that’s a lot more impressive than they are. Also, there’s the injunction to keep every thought captive to Christ, which makes believers reluctant to let their imaginations wander. I think these restrictions on imaginations are limiting.
    Finally, this is also relevant to my Gen. 1 exegesis. The emergents are (I think) prepared to let inerrancy slip while holding onto the big presuppositions of historic Church dogma: one God, all-powerful, foundational to the material world, etc. My project was to go the opposite way: do tight exegesis but suspend the presuppositions, then let the text speak.

    Like

    Comment by ktismatics — 28 September 2006 @ 7:12 pm

  3. K –
    I’ve been in exchanges that were far more heated than the one you mentioned! That one was actually a bit chilly compared to a few I’ve been involved in and/or witnessed!

    You used the word “easy” describing our beliefs about God. I think most of our beliefs about God are inherited. Those of us from Orthodoxy inherited views about God with one qualification: These are essential and absolute dogma. In post-modern lingo our doctrines of God were considerd “presence.”

    Our inherited views are always easier. To imagine other possibilities is dangerous!

    This has positive and negative consequences. It is a safe-guard to the church from heresy, but it also restricts our imaginations. Furthermore, formulaic versions of the God-doctrines tend to get shaken from time to time by the storms of life leaving us in existential and theological limbo (e.g. Job).

    Like

    Comment by Jonathan Erdman — 29 September 2006 @ 4:17 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: