Ktismatics

6 July 2008

An Affair to Remember, 1957

Filed under: Movies — ktismatics @ 1:16 pm

UPDATE, 7 August 08 — And now here are the parallel scenes from Love Affair, 1939. The quality of the print isn’t very good, so the images aren’t as clear.

I didn’t include the parallel to the scene by the villa overlooking the sea. The 1957 version takes place in Villefranche, which is the next town over from Nice where we used to live, and so I included the screen shot for personal nostalgia’s sake. In the original 1939 version the events take place on Madeira, which looks lovely as well.

About these ads

42 Comments »

  1. Wow! Did you ever have a nerve to put THIS one on here. I watched it a few months back, second time I’d seen it, and Grant and Kerr are exquisite. She’s not usually seen as a sex symbol (though she could be sluttish as in ‘From Here to Eternity’), but in her swimsuit she is luscious. Easily one of the most gifted of all film stars and with one of the biggest ranges, I find Deborah Kerr to be incomparable–and one doesn’t always love the most gifted, my trashier tastes in female stars in particular proving this. And while Cary Grant is always Cary Grant, he’s irresistible in this film, more so than in many others. The film’s climax and denouement are very strange and slightly anti-climactic, but this duo is blue ribbon. He has paired quite a variety of ladies, from Mae West and Katharine Hepburn to Grace Kelly and Audrey Hepburn. Someone at the ballet board mentioned that he was first offered Higgins in the film of My Fair Lady but refused it, because there’s always a touch of Cockney in the accent. I’m glad, because Rex Harrison can’t be surpassed for this kind of high-comedy talk as well as the talk-sing that Higgins does.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 6 July 2008 @ 3:13 pm

  2. I just found this, and hadn’t known about the Boyer/Dunne film, which I’ll certainly want to try to find, especially since they used almost the exact screenplay.

    I think Boyer may have the record on most leading ladies paired with: Garbo, Dietrich, K. Hepburn, Ingrid Bergman, Brigitte Bardot ( not really paired, but in ‘La Parisienne’, where Bardot’s pulchritude is not lost on him), Stanwyck, Bette Davis. He’s in one film ‘Thunder in East’ with Deborah Kerr, but I don’t know whether he was the love interest or Alan Ladd.

    I was also interested to read the Marni Nixon did the dubbing for Kerr’s singing here as well as in ‘The King and I’. These are both the most convincing dubbing I’ve ever heard in musical films, and even knowing about King and I, I was sure that this was Kerr singing. The Nixon voice did not work nearly so well in West Side Story (Wood) and My Fair Lady (A. Hepburn), although it is certainly adequate. She’s still active but very old.

    “An Affair to Remember is a 1957 film starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, and directed by Leo McCarey.

    The film is considered one of the most romantic of all time, according to the American Film Institute.[1] The movie was a remake of McCarey’s 1939 film Love Affair, starring Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer. An Affair to Remember was almost identical to Love Affair on a scene to scene basis. McCarey used the same screenplay as the original film, which was penned by Delmer Daves and Donald Ogden Stewart.

    Contributing to the success of the 1957 film is its theme song “An Affair to Remember (Our Love Affair)’ composed by Harry Warren with lyrics by Leo McCarey and Harold Adamson. The song is sung by Vic Damone during the opening credits and then sung later by Deborah Kerr’s character, a nightclub singer. Kerr’s singing was dubbed by Marni Nixon, who also dubbed for Kerr in the film The King and I.”

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 6 July 2008 @ 3:43 pm

  3. Just passing through, but the Grant-Kerr pairing was something to savor, both of them having matured as performers and able to play off each other’s strengths with such grace and ease. Every time they were on-screen together they seemed to invite you into their quiet seduction. The interludes with children, every one was horrible. And the ending did seem particularly forced and kitschy, though I presume they were following the script from the predecessor film on which it was based.

    Comment by ktismatics — 6 July 2008 @ 6:19 pm

  4. Amazingly, she does several very good pictures with Robert Mitchum. I think Mitchum was an amazing movie star, and the epitome of movie macho, along with Cooper.

    I see something else about range from watching two more Vivien Leigh films and now remembering Deborah Kerr and others again: Actors can be very great without having a great emotional range. Leigh is amazing in a historical piece like ‘That Hamilton Woman’, with Olivier. This was Churchill’s favourite film, and it is marvelous. There, Olivier is as handsome as any man I’ve ever seen on film, although Gary Cooper was probably more often beautiful. And Vivien Leigh is exquisite in ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’–she is very much the stage actress on screen, and technically trained; she’s a perfect kittenish Cleopatra, as beautiful a face nearly as possible. She could never have done ‘From Here to Eternity’ or ‘Separate Tables’ or ‘Night of the Iguana’, or even ‘An Affair to Remember’ for that matter, because she was always studied. In this way, she is not as flexible as her equally trained and greater husband, Olivier. I also re-watched over the weekend ‘Pride and Prejudice’, and he was perfectly marvelous as Darcy, fey and peculiarly dainty (and well aware he was doing it, that’s clear), with Edna May Oliver doing her Edith Evans imitations with ‘Missizz Cullins!’ But I’ve decided to watch the rest of her few films. She also, by the way, tried to get Elizabeth in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ after failing to get Joan Fontaine’s role in Rebecca, and I wouldn’t have minded. Greer Garson is good, but not alluring. After that, Selznick did use her in ‘Waterloo Bridge’ and would not use Olivier. She also did an Anna Karinina I’ve never seen, and want to then re-watch Garbo’s and compare them. These films are very potable, and since I haven’t watched any for several months, only operas, I just flip them on and see if there’s anything that strikes me. Some actors are just basically cold, which means they need to be especially good at a limited repertoire. I think Vivien Leigh was like that, and she hated doing films anyway. Deborah Kerr and Cary Grant are very much at ease in films, even though they’re disciplined.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 6 July 2008 @ 6:43 pm

  5. McCarey directed the earlier film as well as this remake. Apparently Warren Beatty and Annette Bening did their own take on the story more recently, probably without nearly the good feeling that Grant and Kerr brought to the proceedings. I did wax nostalgic about the little town where Cary’s old French grandmother lived, which is Villefranche, just around the bend from Nice. The old lady’s house is out at the beginning of Cap Ferrat, on which is perched the fabulous Rotschild villa which is open to the public. Tina Turner and Elton John live in Villefranche at least part of the year.

    Comment by ktismatics — 7 July 2008 @ 10:32 am

  6. I just finished ‘Love Affair’, and the difference with ‘An Affair to Remember’ is quite astonishing. This film has some of the most beautiful black-and-white photography I’ve ever seen in a film. This story is very much a period thing and that’s one of the reasons ‘An Affair to Remember’ is such a disaster. Even the school scenes with the children at Xmas come off in this, and the simple innocent tale is seamless from beginning to end. Ms. Dunne turns out to be wonderful, I’d forgotten how good she can be. Boyer is a better actor than Cary Grant, but the one thing about ‘An Affair to Remember’ that does remain is how those two pros–and Kerr and Grant really are excellent in it–pay no attention to their absurd circumstances, and prove themselves to be troupers. But the strangeness of even calling this story a ‘love story’ is explained by seeing Boyer and Dunne. It was purely a period kind of tale, and wouldn’t have been a popular kind of pulp by the mid-50s.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 30 July 2008 @ 4:57 pm

  7. Okay, I’m adding it to the Netflix queue forthwith.

    Comment by ktismatics — 30 July 2008 @ 4:59 pm

  8. Patrick, we watched Love Affair last night and I agree that it’s significantly superior to the remake, in all the ways you describe. The shipboard romance seems more believable — more like love — because Boyer and Dunne are able to put more passion and depth into their performances. Grant and Kerr are fun, but they always seem like they’re just playing. Plus Irene Dunne really can sing. It’s surprising the studio decided to remake it.

    Curious differences between both versions and Sleepless in Seattle, the subsequent homage. Instead of splitting between New York and Europe, the new version traverses between New York and Seattle. The lovers aren’t globetrotting leisured sophisticates who force themselves to go to work; rather, they’re yuppies. And the romance is brokered by the Tom Hanks character’s son. And the Empire State rendezvous is delayed not by months but by maybe half an hour, inasmuch as the Meg Ryan character is not hit by a car and paralyzed en route.

    Comment by ktismatics — 7 August 2008 @ 4:58 pm

  9. Grant and Kerr are fun, but they always seem like they’re just playing.

    Yeah, they’re pros and know they’ve been stuck with a dog.

    Is ‘Sleepless in Seattle’ worth seeing? Those are not favourite performers of mine, but the movie got a lot of attention and I think I remember it was very successful.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 7 August 2008 @ 5:06 pm

  10. Oh, and also, I added to the post the screen shots from Love Affair that parallel those in An Affair to Remember. The black and white is moodier, and the aging of the print bestows the feeling of a bygone era — which of course it is.

    Comment by ktismatics — 7 August 2008 @ 5:07 pm

  11. Sleepless in Seattle is cute, but not as good as Love Affair, an opinion shared by my wife, daughter, and myself.

    Comment by ktismatics — 7 August 2008 @ 5:12 pm

  12. Yes, they’re nice. The one of Irene from behind reminds me of Garbo in ‘Anna Christie’. She has reminded me of Garbo before, which is a little puzzling. I think that it must be some physical characteristics, but also a self-possession despite the fact that one is deeply religious and rather conservative, the other world-weary with having to carry around her goddess status through the streets of New York, even though she could certainly have found a much less stimulating anonymity back in Stockholm had she wanted to give up her ‘career’ completely. Of course she didn’t, she loved being looked for in the streets.

    But I like the shots from France in the 50s version too. They were more like tourist photos of italy of Southern France. The photography of late 30s New York in ‘love Affair’ is truly spacious and superb!

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 7 August 2008 @ 5:15 pm

  13. an opinion shared by my wife, daughter, and myself.

    Thanks all, I like it when people save me time. I think I can live without it, somehow. By the way, am watching Lang’s very long early silent (1922) Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, and will report on it in a day or two.

    And wasn’t the scene with Dunne at the end having to stay seated on the sofa so much more convincing and less contrived? This is what I meant by a ‘period piece’, but in this case it’s a compliment, because many period pieces are masterful. And they are embedded with classical elements which keep them in good technical shape and make us want to see them long after they’ve become ‘dated’.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 7 August 2008 @ 5:19 pm

  14. Is ‘Sleepless in Seattle’ worth seeing?

    Darling only if you can muster up the courage to believe in MEG RYAN for fuck’s sakes! It’s HORRIBLE!

    Comment by parodycenter — 7 August 2008 @ 9:02 pm

  15. I admit I did not want to see Meg Ryan, and was praying for no recommendations. There is this one twit at the ballet board who actually seemed upset that her career hadn’t skyrocketed. I have rarely heard so paltry a lament.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 7 August 2008 @ 9:55 pm

  16. If there’s anything on the planet that perfectly embodies my definition of a WYMAN, it’s her. In this sickening movie with Matthew Broderick ADDICTED TO LOVE (who was deliberately cast as a puppy-eyed bottom because you know that’s Romaaaantic), she spends several years getting fucked out of her brains by a muscle stud because he needs an American green card; the scenario then proceeds to establish her coming to wimman-independence by learning to take charge of things. She ends the relationship with Jean Claude van Damme and opts for the puppy-eyed bottom because you know, sentiment wins over intelligence in the end. The last I saw of the abomination she was doing some pretentious wimman flick directed by Jane Campion, whose PIANO PLAYER I wanted to organize islamic fundamentalists to protest against. I think she should be made to wear a veil!

    Comment by parodycenter — 7 August 2008 @ 10:57 pm

  17. The additional horror of Nora Ephron movies is that she always has some annoying fatso like Rosie O’Donnel playing as the house-sitting counterpart to the much more successful and alluring Ryan, by which these movies reveal their deep intrinsic bigotry posing as Romanticism. The O’Donnel character serves exclusively to wipe Meg Ryan’s ass while she goes through her histrionic romances, and has no function in life otherwise – and that because she’s FAT.

    Comment by parodycenter — 7 August 2008 @ 11:01 pm

  18. Sleepless in Seattle is cute, but not as good as Love Affair, an opinion shared by my wife, daughter, and myself.

    But listen to Clysmatics please. In the previous thread he agreed with you on the misgivings of post-modernism almost completely, and here he’s prepared to pull out his Cleenex over Sleepless in Seattle because the wife and the kids agree. Comparing that to something like An Affair to Remember is simply criminal. This really isn’t even McDonald’s family marketing material, this is something worse, although I don’t have the right word yet.

    Comment by parodycenter — 7 August 2008 @ 11:04 pm

  19. I don’t mind being manipulated by movies, which is why I don’t hate Spielberg movies. Sleepless is cute, starring the prince and princess of cute. It’s strange that Sleepless uses a shrink call-in show to get the ball rolling, then Meg writes Tom a letter, Tom’s son responds, and the cute threesome meet for the first time at the top of the Empire State. It’s really much more like Shop Around the Corner, which the Efron, Hanks and Ryan actually do remake much more directly a few years later. In Sleepless, Rosie and Meg use An Affair to Remember as romantic stimulus: wouldn’t it be loverly to meet a man like Cary Grant, and for him to be so loyal in his attachments, etc. On the call-in radio the kid tells the shrink that his dad is still pining for the dead wife, which shows his capacity for loyal love and provokes Meg to grab it for herself. Because Meg works as a journalist she’s able to use her sources to break through Tom’s anonymity and find out where he lives and what he does for a living (an architect!). She gets on a plane from NY to Seattle and stalks him at his house (a houseboat on Puget Sound!), sees him (cute!) playing with his son (all boy!) on the seashore. Since Tom meets all the criteria, Meg arranges the rendezvous at the top of the New York tower (her home turf, so he has to show his desire first). But it’s the son who flies to NY to find her, the dad catches the next plane to find the son, et voila!

    There’s a certain trajectory in performance from Boyer to Grant to Hanks, and also from Dunne to Kerr to Ryan. They become less glamorous, nicer, less romantic, show less depth of emotion (although Cary and Tom are pretty close on this score). Is it the acting that’s changed, or the way people occupy the world? Boyer, Grant, and Kerr weren’t Americans, so maybe there’s a difference in that regard. Sleepless celebrates American cuteness, niceness, ordinariness, emotional stability, social isolation, commitment to egoistic happiness in long-term attachments and in self-expressive career choices. No wonder it was a popular movie.

    Comment by ktismatics — 8 August 2008 @ 5:55 am

  20. Sleepless in Seattle is cute, but not as good as Love Affair, an opinion shared by my wife, daughter, and myself.

    But listen to Clysmatics please. In the previous thread he agreed with you on the misgivings of post-modernism almost completely, and here he’s prepared to pull out his Cleenex over Sleepless in Seattle because the wife and the kids agree. Comparing that to something like An Affair to Remember is simply criminal. This really isn’t even McDonald’s family marketing material, this is something worse, although I don’t have the right word yet.

    dejan, he was comparing it to ‘Love Affair’, which is much superior to ‘An Affair to Remember’, if you will please read the thread. Wife and kid and husband have seem all 3, and he only says ‘Sleepless’ is ‘cute.’ You haven’t seen ‘Love Affair’, which is from 1939 and can go through very dated events without being irritating, which they are in ‘Affair to Remember which comes 16 or 17 years later.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 7:13 am

  21. “There’s a certain trajectory in performance from Boyer to Grant to Hanks, and also from Dunne to Kerr to Ryan. They become less glamorous, nicer, less romantic, show less depth of emotion”

    I don’t think Grant and Kerr become less glamorous or nice than Dunne (in fact, I think Kerr is much more naturally glamorous than Dunne, and quite as good an actress as well), but they have no choice but to ‘be less romantic and show less depth of emotion’ because the story is now being seen through a glass darkly if ever one has. They are remarkably plucky under the circumstances. Dunne is a beautiful and sensitive actress, but glamour has never been especially emphasized by her.

    It took forever to find the Dame Edith quote by Bryan Forbes. He write “I was also fascinated to learn that she never saw herself as a tragedienne or wanted to play in tragedy because she did not really believe in it. She thought it was a lovely form, but that it was not true. Predictably she was asked to play Lady Macbeth several times during her career, but always refused. ‘Don’t think much of her,’ she said. ‘She’s not complete. I can’t play people who are only half-finished. Shakespeare never finished her’.” This was a woman who knew herself extremely well, and it’s quite instructive to realize how possible it is to get right up close to the towering giants and make up your mind about them without asking anyone’s permission.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 7:22 am

  22. Our order of preference went from oldest to newest, even though we watched them in reverse order. Some nostalgia is involved, but Love Affair is best at both depicting and going beyond its era. Sleepless tapped into and shaped a contemporary romanticomedic chick-flick vein that’s subsequently gotten callused from too many needle marks.

    Comment by ktismatics — 8 August 2008 @ 7:25 am

  23. Thanks for all the feedback on ‘Sleepless’. It sounds quite repellent.For movies with an architect hero, it’s much better to just go with ‘The Fountainhead’ with Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal. Some one of the Marxists put up this cover with some sort of free-standing structure and said it would be a good cover for the Rand book, but I think it was for all these Big Names in the Thinker Business.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 7:28 am

  24. “they have no choice but to ‘be less romantic and show less depth of emotion’ because the story is now being seen through a glass darkly if ever one has.”

    In Sleepless, Rosie and Meg look for the romantic ideal not to the Boyer-Dunne original but to the Grant-Kerr remake. The ideal is already an imitation.

    The Macbeth performance last night required significant self-discipline in order to avoid daydreaming or falling asleep. We were too far from the stage which made it difficult, but the acting was perfunctory. Only one character brought life to his role, and it was a comedic turn by a porter. Lady Macbeth isn’t complete I suppose because she has to channel her ambition through her husband, yet she’s overcome by her remorse even though she wasn’t even the one wielding the dagger. She’s aggressive and manipulative and duplicitous — not at all a nice person, which makes her great. But we don’t see her making the transition to remorse, other than with the compulsive hand-washing. Lord Macbeth progresses and regresses more interestingly. It’s hard to fault Shakespeare though — there’s only so much one can do in a single work, especially at the dawning of the era of psychological interiority.

    Comment by ktismatics — 8 August 2008 @ 7:37 am

  25. In Sleepless, Rosie and Meg use An Affair to Remember as romantic stimulus: wouldn’t it be loverly to meet a man like Cary Grant, and for him to be so loyal in his attachments, etc

    Clysmatics of course you don’t mind being manipulated by movies. You don’t mind being manipulated in general. Just bend over and I’ll make some more red stripes, your pain will be over in a jiffy. Didn’t you HEAR ME when I said that Rosie O’Donnel sits there on her useless fat ass being the asswipe of the corporate WASP princess, whose inner vacuity is only matched by her bland looks? What does it matter which of the old movies are being resurrected by this DRECK?

    Comment by parodycenter — 8 August 2008 @ 8:09 am

  26. Sleepless does channel an affect that’s pervasive in the culture, though of course it embeds it in the individual egos toward which the actors gesture by virtue of their pleasant and likable screen personalities, rather than being empty placeholders like the Batman. Anyhow it was an interesting study to see all three of these movies. And sure I heard you about Rosie O’Donnel, and I agree: she’s the fat unattractive funny sidekick, highlighting by contrast Meg’s friendly pleasant attractiveness. Meg mostly has to be appealing to the women who comprise most of the audience, so Rosie stands in for the audience in this regard.

    Comment by ktismatics — 8 August 2008 @ 9:07 am

  27. “And sure I heard you about Rosie O’Donnel, and I agree: she’s the fat unattractive funny sidekick, highlighting by contrast Meg’s friendly attractiveness.”

    And Rosie O’Donnell is so thoroughly repellent in all ways that she can even light up rather prosaic Meg Ryan, I guess. Her appearances on Barbara Walters’s silly women’s show last year (I only read about it) were the most embarassing behaviours in the public eye for some time. Then she toyed with getting Bob Barker’s old job on ‘The Price is Right’, but said ‘I just don’t need the money.’ She gives butch Lesbians an even worse name than even they already had, and Donald Trump was, for once, hilarious when he went out of control and said ‘we are talking about an extremely unattractive woman…’ and that ‘Barbara can’t stand her..’ A few weeks after Ms. O’Donnell was ‘disappeared’ from ‘The View’, she happened to be at the early run of Patti Lupone’s Gypsy and being very gracious to fans outside the theater–probably took 10 years off her to get rid of that nightmare blast furnace. Older than I thought too–Ms. Walters is a bullshit artist, but clever, and is 76, still very sexy and surprisingly much more luscious-looking off-camera. And I don’t have a think for women that old–it’s just that she has really kept her figure.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 9:16 am

  28. I’m fascinated at how hypnotized the entire group of leftist bloggers is with the Batman thing. And nothing interests me about it at all. You can see much more about what’s happening by reading the NYTimes, no matter what Arpege says. Traxus says nothing of interest about it, just writes more of his second-hand hot air. And Steppling must be on vacation with no money to do anywhere, if he re-attaches himself to Arpege at every new post, where they can try to talk about Fascism and billionaires and privacy, and then try not to. She’s set to go in for the kill sometime over the weekend I’d guess.

    By the way, dejan, traxus lived in New York for about 2 years, also in Brooklyn like you, and he knows profoundly NOTHING about it.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 9:19 am

  29. he happened to be at the early run of Patti Lupone’s Gypsy and being very gracious to fans outside the theater–

    Barbara Walters, I meant here, not Ms. O’Donnell. Ms. Walters really is a surprisingly beautiful woman in person.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 9:20 am

  30. O’Donnel looks like a bulldog from Tom and Jerry cartoons haven’t you noticed, and the worst thing is she trots between Madanna’s feet like a fat chiuhaha trying to be a butch bulldog. In the 90s they would appear on these wimman telly shows with Rosie laughing ”self-ironically” at the jokes Madanna made about her weight (???). It was beyond despicable.Later they went on to star together in a wimman baseball movie *A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN or something where O’Donnel was still wiping Madanna’s ass. The only scene the movie was missing to be completely distasteful is a shot of Rosie eating Madanna’s leftover snacks in the locker room. As Patsy Stone says, it was unmentionable. I think it is this class of people that tarnish America’s reputation in the world more than any George W Bush (Bush is the type of a villain you expect to get). As for Meg Ryan, she has iconic status as the non-personality that marked the decline of American TV into FRIENDS territory. Mind you I’m not saying that all bland cunts have to be awful – take Heather Locklear, quite a decent type of TV trash. But this one has feminist ”pedigree”. BARF!

    I saw Steppling’s movie and thought it was quite okay – the slightly homoerotic jail story with W. Dafoe. But it would be a relief for world cinema if he finally actually wrote a script himself in order to show these young people how it’s done instead of whining on Sherbert’s outmoded blawg. I agree that the tail wagging is repellent. Anycase I am not restoring the link to his blawg until he quits the Sherbert boudoir.

    Comment by parodycenter — 8 August 2008 @ 9:47 am

  31. By the way, dejan, traxus lived in New York for about 2 years, also in Brooklyn like you, and he knows profoundly NOTHING about it.

    Look this is the deal: if you want to be the top and chastise me, then I expect you to pick up the tab as well – in this case this would mean lodging and fancy dining in New York for at least a month so that I can experience the refined Romanticism that escaped me on my middle class budget!

    Comment by parodycenter — 8 August 2008 @ 9:57 am

  32. God Childie has really hit rock bottom in the Xanadu serfdom. He agrees with Missus on all counts. But the silly thing about this hard Marxist critique is that in Yugoslavia we had an identical situation: you had state sponsored movies which were exclusively made to extol the virtue of Our Leader Tito (the same one who fucked up the country to the point of multiple civil war) and they were all Batman, possibly much worse because they overtly championed militant machismo under the guise of anti-fascism, and you had independent-minded movies, also funded by the state, but dealing exclusively with safe subjects that critisized our socialist society only in the most harmless ways. Whenever a film would turn really subversive, the author would be expelled or sent to the Naked Island, which was the Yugoslav version of the Gulag. Our best filmmaker Makavejev had to move to Australia (and paradox of paradoxes, in Australia he discovered that he could make subversive movies against Coca-Cola but which nobody really wanted to see unless there were great boobs in it). But a Hard Marxist just can’t face the idea that there’s no utopia because no single society has ever let outstanding individuals complete freedom. In all societies you had to opt for poverty or isolation if you wanted real freedom. Marxism – always this insane idea of Paradise on Earth.

    Comment by parodycenter — 8 August 2008 @ 10:03 am

  33. I saw Steppling’s movie and thought it was quite okay

    It is quite a good movie, and Ann-Margret is stunningly beautiful in it, as well as very good. When she says ‘That HURTS…’on being informed of Scheider’s infidelity, she gets it exactly right–not out of control, ever, but what it really feels like to implode and absorb all of it (or most of it) right then.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 10:09 am

  34. Clysmatics by the way a widget on your Southland post linked to an interesting review saying that the film was a critique of leftist radicals, and I happen to agree. But I don’t want to start that on this thread, if you’d care to read that opinion we can proceed on the Southland thread.

    Comment by parodycenter — 8 August 2008 @ 10:20 am

  35. the decline of American TV into FRIENDS territory.

    Isn’t the Anniston entity even worse? She looks like Tom Sawyer.

    Comment by Patrick J. Mullins — 8 August 2008 @ 10:37 am

  36. Dejan it looks like your post-Kosovo predictions are coming true: Russian tanks are rolling into Georgia.

    Comment by ktismatics — 8 August 2008 @ 1:53 pm

  37. Dejan it looks like your post-Kosovo predictions are coming true: Russian tanks are rolling into Georgia.

    He he he I wonder how many pairs of Trotskyan lingerie have fallen on the news. Notice the painful irony: the West is now defending exactly the (Georgian) position it used as an excuse to bomb Serbia! The pipl’s right to self-determination is pissing in the Trotskyist’s face right now as we speak. CNN was especially amusing: the reporters were scared shitless. One of them said, ”it seems like we’re dealing with an angry Russia here. It’s never good to deal with an angry Russia.”

    Comment by parodycenter — 8 August 2008 @ 4:57 pm

  38. Isn’t the Anniston entity even worse? She looks like Tom Sawyer.

    Jesus the collection of drama queens in that show, it’s stomach-churning. They give a new meaning to the expression ”uppity”. I wish I could act this out for you, it’s difficult to put in words, but the way they act / move on FRIENDS is just like the Looney Tunes. I was wondering the other day which abomination is responsible for this trend (apart from Ryan), and then I remembered that Wes Craven got the ”brilliant” idea in his PoMo SCREAM series to cast FRIENDS-type characters in a horror film, in a move which effectively ended the history of horror film.

    Comment by parodycenter — 9 August 2008 @ 4:32 am

  39. Patrick Clysmatics is slipping into his 1950s persona again, discussing normalcy and deviation with Christians. This is what happens when you overdose on Cary Grant and Frank Capra-type discussions. We must help now by crossing over to some meatier subjects.

    Comment by parodycenter — 9 August 2008 @ 4:34 am

  40. I’ve never seen Friends, and I’ve never been inside a Costco store. I fear I’d find something to like in both, so I stay away in horror.

    Comment by ktismatics — 9 August 2008 @ 4:45 am

  41. Dejan, I looked for the link on Southland about it being a critique of leftist radicals but couldn’t find it.

    Last night we watched Out of Africa, starring the redoubtable Meryl Streep and Robert Redford. Imperialist, classist, racist, sexist AND boring. Nice photography though.

    Comment by ktismatics — 9 August 2008 @ 10:56 am

  42. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on seeking an affair.
    Regards

    Comment by seeking affair — 16 March 2014 @ 9:37 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The WordPress Classic Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 95 other followers

%d bloggers like this: