Ktismatics

23 July 2007

Charolastra Manifesto

Filed under: Ktismata — ktismatics @ 11:47 am

1. There is no greater honor than being a Charolastra.

2. Do whatever you feel like.

3. Pop beats poetry.

4. Get high at least once a day.

5. You shall not screw another Charolastra’s girl.

6. Whoever likes Team America is a fag.

7. Whacking off rules.

8. Never marry a virgin.

9. Whoever roots for Team America… (it’s worth repeating)

10. Truth is cool, but unattainable.

11. The asshole who breaks any of the previous rules loses his title of “Charolastra.”

(from Y Tu Mama Tambien)

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5 Comments »

  1. Luisa’s Manifesto (later in the movie):
    1. I won’t screw either of you. You can screw each other if you like.
    2. I’m going to sunbathe naked. I don’t want you sniffing around like dogs.
    3. I pick the music.
    4. The moment I ask, please shut your mouths.
    5. You cook.
    6. No stories about your poor girlfriends.
    7. If I ask, stay 10 yards from me. Or better 100.
    8. Obviously you do all the manual labor.
    9. You may not speak of things you don’t agree on. Even better, just keep your mouths shut.
    10. You’re not allowed to contradict me.

    Comment by ktismatics — 23 July 2007 @ 2:55 pm

  2. Much more down to earth than Galatians.

    Comment by samlcarr — 23 July 2007 @ 9:08 pm

  3. Ask the questions that have no answers.
    Invest in the millenium. Plant sequoias.
    Say that your main crop is the forest
    that you did not plant,
    that you will not live to harvest.
    Say that the leaves are harvested
    when they have rotted into the mold.
    Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.

    Put your faith in the two inches of humus
    that will build under the trees
    every thousand years.
    Listen to carrion – put your ear
    close, and hear the faint chattering
    of the songs that are to come.
    Expect the end of the world. Laugh.
    Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
    though you have considered all the facts.
    So long as women do not go cheap
    for power, please women more than men.
    Ask yourself: Will this satisfy
    a woman satisfied to bear a child?
    Will this disturb the sleep
    of a woman near to giving birth?

    Wendell Berry – A Manifesto (excerpt)

    Comment by samlcarr — 23 July 2007 @ 9:43 pm

  4. “Much more down to earth than Galatians.”

    Alternative versions of the Law. Jacques-Alain Miller (Lacan’s son-in-law) says that the moral imperative of our age is “Enjoy!” If the Law creates transgressive desire, what avenues of transgression remain available to those who subscribe to a hedonistic manifesto?

    Comment by ktismatics — 24 July 2007 @ 10:35 am

  5. The Wendell Berry Manifesto conveys a sort of melancholy that reminded me of something the Japanese call wabi-sabi. Wabi = humble and simple; sabi = rusty and weathered — it’s an aesthetic of impermanence that pays homage to the endless passage of time. Here’s a quote from this description of wabi-sabi:

    Sabi things carry the burden of their years with dignity and grace: the chilly mottled surface of an oxidized silver bowl, the yielding gray of weathered wood, the elegant withering of a bereft autumn bough. An old car left in a field to rust, as it transforms from an eyesore into a part of the landscape, could be considered America’s contribution to the evolution of sabi. An abandoned barn, as it collapses in on itself, holds this mystique. There’s an aching poetry in things that carry this patina, and it transcends the Japanese. We Americans are ineffably drawn to old European towns with their crooked cobblestone streets and chipping plaster, to places battle scarred with history much deeper than our own. We seek sabi in antiques and even try to manufacture it in distressed furnishings. True sabi cannot be acquired, however. It is a gift of time.

    Comment by ktismatics — 24 July 2007 @ 4:47 pm


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